An AMAZING 100 Word Story

 

Black Hole

Silence. I rap against the cool, steel safe door. No one comes. I delicately chew on my stolen Snickers bar, savouring it in case I’m stuck here for a few days. Crouching in the enclosed space, a sliver of light penetrates through a small space at the bottom of the safe door. I can just make out another piece of paper with a massive black spot in the middle of the page. Shoving my Snickers bar into my pocket, I pick up the paper and glide my arm through the spot and it disappears again. I pull out my arm and hastily place the black hole on the inside of the safe door, I plunge my head through the hole and my body slithers back onto the hard, office floor. I’m free, not for long….

By Bianca.

Anzac Day Snapshots

Our class  worked on rich writing after we had participated in an Anzac Day Prayer Service and looked at some of the Anzac information loaded on our blog. In snapshot writing, the goal is to make the reader feel like he/she is right in the moment of what is happening. The focus is on the senses – what can I see, smell, hear, taste and touch and how do these things make me feel. Here are some samples of our writing:

 

Suffering and Mateship                      8/7/1917

I see people leaping for cover as blood pours all over the dusty ground, the sounds of the enemy coming closer and closer. Suddenly, I hear an ear splitting cry! I spin around (one eye still on the enemy’s guns) and I see a fighter lying on the ground, holding his stomach. I sprint to the spot where he lays and fall to my knees at his side. I look around desperately at the surrounding chaos. I see the boat we arrived on. I pull and pull, yanking his arm over the rim and lie him down. I take off my shirt and wrap it around his wounds. “You’ll be alright, mate” And I know this is only the beginning!  

(by Mady)

Anzac Snapshot: Death and loss.

Here I stand on muddy ground with bodies and blood sprawled everywhere. Here I look, there have been so many lives lost and these bodies are no longer able to return to their loved ones. Here I ask myself, why did I ever come here? What’s the point of fighting when so many soldiers go to war and so few return. I never wanted to be a murderer and yet here I am, deeply regretting what I have done on the shores of Gallipoli.

(by Bianca)

Ngawangchodron Poppy Explosion: ecstaticist remix

Guest Post by Bianca and Kikki: Michael Mangan visits Holy Spirit!

On Monday, Michael Mangan came to our school to perform two concerts for us. He lives in Brisbane and he writes and sings songs about our faith in God. He played guitar along with singing. He told us he also plays piano. His songs taught us about the different ways of praising God. After he sang each song, he told us what he thinks of the meanings of his songs and made us think of how we can make our relationship with God stronger. He showed us some actions to some of his songs that made us want to sing along. One of his latest albums came out last year, but still rock our world this year as he taught us each one. We all had lots of fun with him, rocking out and praising softly.

 

Guest Post from Paul, Emma and Bianca

This week in literacy, we have been looking into the features of a picture story book. Our class, 5/6  M and M have been split into groups of up to four and have taken turns in sharing their picture story book that they have chosen to study. As well as discussing our picture story book, we also had to create a front cover for our litracy book along with a  favourite picture and sentence. Here are Paul, Emma and Bianca’s front covers for our literacy activity which were chosen by Mary as the best picture story book front covers.

Ditosa’s Story

Today we watched Ditosa’s Story from the Project Compassion Website. Each year, Caritas put together a story to tell what the Project Compassion funds have achieved for a community. You can watch Ditosa’s Story here:

 

 

Here are some of our reflections after watching the story and considering the questions What does this story mean to me and What can I do?

This story made an impact on my life and showed me how lucky I am to live the way I do. I can easily walk to a tap, I have proper education, I have good shelter, enough food to survive and many other amazing things that I am extremely lucky to have. by Grace

Ditosa’s story has really touched my heart and my mind. It is hard to imagine what it would be like if I didn’t have parents, education and not much food or clean water. I want to do as much as I can to donate to Caritas so that I can help lots of other poor communities around the world. Everyone has the same rights to the essentials in life. by Bianca

To me, this story means that I have to be grateful for what I have because there are people everywhere who don’t have everything they need. To help these people in need, I can put money into the Caritas box as often as I can. I can do this by whenever I do a job put half of the money in the box. Then the poor can buy what they need with the money. by Hannah G

This story means donation won’t really help me but can make a HUGE difference to the little village in Mozambique and to Ditosa’s family. Knowing there are people in the world is sad, with others in the world driving Ferrari’s and living in mansions when there are people who don’t have clean water and can’t afford food for the family. Even donating 5c can make a difference and help Caritas make the world a better place. by Paul

After I watched this clip I felt that if my family lived there, I would be very proud of my family and my community and me, because the community has developed so, so much. So I think we should spend more time on raising money for communities like this one and make people’s lives so much better. by Harriet 

How does this clip touch your heart and your head? 

What can YOU do?